Fashion

Trend for coloured hair takes its inspiration from childhood toys

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Not for the first time, the latest hair trend requires you to dig deep into your past: welcome to the rise of My Little Pony hair. Inspired by the colourful manes of the little plastic toys, rainbow hair has become the go-to hair trend for young women. Bleach salon, which recently branched out from east London to Soho, arguably pioneered the trend for extreme hair colour which has seen pink, dip dye (where the ends are “dipped” in a contrasting colour) and even premature grey become trend fixtures. According to Bleach founder Alex Brownsell, rainbow-coloured hair is the next logical step in hair colour. She said: “Hair trends tend to move in 10-year cycles. Over eight years ago, we did our first dip dye but now, almost a decade later, it’s sort of everywhere. The young kids don’t want dip

Black hair: why it’s time to stop politicising it

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For nearly a century, black men’s and women’s hair has been a political declaration, a cultural statement, a social media moment – and sometimes all three. Think Angela Davis, fist raised at a 1960s Black Panther rally; Pam Grier, “the baddest one-chick hit-squad” in the 1970s movie Coffy; Erykah Badu looking skyward on the cover of her 2003 album Worldwide Underground, Solange Knowles holding court in a white cape at her 2014 wedding, and, most recently, Lineisy Montero being named fashion’s breakout model of the year. Afro hair has been the stuff of books, university courses and documentaries, its history too long and heady to be expounded here. But as the sight of black hair in its unpermed, unstraightened state becomes ever more common in fashion and the media, one thing has become cle

Denim hair: what does it mean?

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Denim hair is the latest online hair trend, and became more than simply a hashtag when Kylie Jenner did it last week. Like rainbow hair, it is less about what you look like IRL and more about what looks good on Instagram. This internetification of our physical appearance means we are bound by the logic of the web: the bigger the wow factor, the bigger the impact. The rise of the selfie also means the focus is now on your shoulders and your head – “portraiting”. In this context, individual features (your lips, your eyes) become more important – and your hair becomes the ultimate accessory. It also helps that it looks really good: the way the shades fall within the locks of hair is positively Rubenesque. Plus, it looks even better under the Instagram filters Ludwig and Mayfair. “The colour

Rainbow children: how the dip-dye trend has gone from shocking to mainstream

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Ten years is a long time for any trend to stay relevant, not least a hairstyle. But this year it will be a full decade since the “dip-dye” caught on with a certain type of fashion-conscious woman – think models such as Charlotte Free or the singer M.I.A. However, now that Kim Kardashian has adopted the two-tone look, it seems set to become one of the defining hairstyles of the age. A dip-dye involves leaving the roots undyed, or dark, and the ends bleached or coloured. “That whole two-tone look has evolved quite a bit,” explains Alex Brownsell, founder of the London salon Bleach, who arguably invented the dip-dye as we know it. “The first five years we did it, it was shocking. Now it’s fashion-conscious, but it’s not a trend any more.” Her comments may be damning on one level, but are perh

Dyson launches Pure Cool Link air purifier to clean up household air

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Dyson’s new Pure Cool Link air purifying fan promises to clean up the air in your home, but also marks the first step of the British engineering firm into the Internet of Things. The Pure Cool Link, which comes in both desk or tower versions, is a new version of the company’s luxury fans and adds an ultrafine filter that removes dirt from the air before sending it around your room. Tobacco smoke, cookers and fires, moulds, aerosols and household chemicals can all create significant levels of pollutants in the home. Dyson says the new activated carbon and 360-degree glass HEPA filter – which works in a similar manner to those fitted to high-end vacuums – captures up 99.95% of pollutants in the air in the home, including dust, smells, chemicals, pollen, spores, smoke and anything else 0.1mic
Promising lab-grown skin sprouts hair and grows glands

Promising lab-grown skin sprouts hair and grows glands

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Scientists in Japan have successfully transplanted mice with lab-grown skin that has more of the organ's working parts in place than ever before. Starting with stem cells made from a mouse's gums, they managed to craft skin with multiple layers - as well as hair follicles and sweat glands. When implanted into a "nude mouse" with a suppressed immune system, it integrated well and sprouted hairs. Researchers say this success will take 5-10 years to translate into humans. But eventually, the team hopes their system will lead to perfectly functioning skin that can be grown from the cells of burns victims and transplanted back on to them. Personalised organs This would be vastly superior to the culturing and grafting techniques that are currently available, which produce skin without many of ...

Now anyone can build their own version of Microsoft’s racist, sexist chatbot Tay

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Microsoft has released open source tools for people to build their own chatbots, as it set out its view of the immediate future of artificial intelligence as conversational aids similar to its back-firing Tay experiment. The company’s chief executive Satya Nadella took to the stage at Microsoft’s Build developer conference to announced a new BotFramework, which will allow developers to build bots that respond to chat messages sent via Skype, Slack, Telegram, GroupMe, emails and text messages. “Bots are the new apps,” Nadella said. The announcement came on the same day that the company had had to pull its chatbot experiment Tay from Twitter after it tweeted about taking drugs and started spamming users. It had only been active again for a few hours after previously being deactivated for mak
Manhattan real estate breaks new price records

Manhattan real estate breaks new price records

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Reports of the demise of luxury real estate in Manhattan may have been greatly exaggerated — or perhaps just early. Manhattan real estate prices set a new record during the first quarter, with the average price of an apartment topping $2 million for the first time in history, according to a report from Douglas Elliman and Miller Samuel Real Estate Appraisers & Consultants. The average price per square foot also set a new record, hitting $1,713. Granted, sales have slowed. Though the total number of sales, 2,877, grew 8 percent compared to the same quarter last year, they slipped 3 percent compared to the fourth quarter of 2015. On a year-over-year basis, the number of sales has fallen for the past seven quarters. Meanwhile, listing inventory increased 5 percent over the year. Y
Miami Open: Victoria Azarenka avenges Angelique Kerber loss to reach final

Miami Open: Victoria Azarenka avenges Angelique Kerber loss to reach final

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In-form Victoria Azarenka battled past an ailing but determined second seed Angelique Kerber to set up a Miami Open final showdown against Svetlana Kuznetsova with a 6-2 7-5 victory on Thursday. With the victory, the 13th-seeded Belarusian gained revenge for a quarter-final loss to the second-seeded German at the Australian Open, her only defeat of the season, but had to fight tooth and nail to earn it in a 94-minute tussle. Kerber, who had her upper left leg covered in heavy strapping, looked dead and buried on several occasions in the second set but was able to stay alive with a gutsy break when Azarenka served for the match at 5-4. Parity was short-lived, however, as Kerber handed back the break in the next game and Azarenka did not waste another opportunity to seal the deal to move one...
Would You Let Companies Monitor You For Money?

Would You Let Companies Monitor You For Money?

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In the smart home of the (not-so-distant) future, sensors will record and process occupants’ every coming and going. Opened the fridge at 3 a.m.? Noted. Washing machine hasn’t run in weeks? Your house knows. Daily habits, mealtimes, bedtime? All on file. That’s a lot of information, and the majority of people polled in a survey released on Thursday say they’d be very worried about hackers and criminals gaining access to their (hypothetical) smart-home data. But that doesn’t mean they’d want to keep that data to themselves. In fact, just over half of the 9,000 people surveyed worldwide said they’d share data about themselves with companies in exchange for cash. The survey was conducted last summer by Vanson Bourne, a technology-research company, on behalf of Intel Security. In a way, its